Tag Archives: Poultry farming

Poultry farming turns into money-spinner for ex-accountant

It is the desire to be her own boss that saw Lillian Akinyi Okwiri become one of the most successful poultry keepers in Kisumu.

Mrs Okwiri, 50, quit her job as an accountant after being in formal employment for only six months. To her friends, this was a risky gamble but she was convinced that time was ripe for her to go into self-employment.

“I always dreamt of being my own boss someday and I opted to hasten the process. What worried me most was whether I would still earn as much money as I did when I was employed,” she says.

After quitting her accounting job, she realised that she didn’t have enough money to go into poultry rearing, a market she had realised had few players.
She started with selling second-hand clothes to generate enough cash to venture into poultry keeping.

“I also started making ice-cream from my house and selling it to school-going children. I got a little cash and added it to what I was earning from the clothes business,” she says.

After a few months, she had raised Sh30,000 and was ready for take off. I had no formal training in poultry keeping, but had the urge to make money and that is what has seen me thrive, she says.

“I had done little research and realised that Kenyan traders import poultry products such as eggs from neighbouring counties. I knew that there was money in this venture,” she says.

She started with 150 day-old layer chicks costing Sh100 each and converted one of her bedrooms to house the birds.

After five weeks, the broilers were ready for the market while layers took between four to five months to start laying eggs. Soon she moved the chicken from her bedroom to a structure that could accommodate 600 chicks.

“I used local materials, wire mesh and iron sheets,” she says.

Counting her profits every day, Mrs Okwiri is doing booming business and is an envy of many in Kisumu’s Nyamasaria estate and has a total of 1,000 chicks—700 broilers and 300 layers.

She has turned into a beacon of success for many women who seek advise on poultry keeping.

Years later, does she regret quitting formal employment?

“I have no regrets because I made the right move. Had I clung onto my job then, I wouldn’t have made such impressive strides,” she says.
Mrs Okwiri says she gets at least Sh100,000 every five weeks from selling broilers which costs Sh400 each.

“ I collect close to 10 crates of eggs every day with a crate selling at Sh330,” she says

When business is at its peak, she says she receive orders to supply up to 150 birds per day. ‘‘During such periods, I am forced to wake up as early as 4 am and to hire more casual labourers,” she says.

She mainly sells broilers to hotels and learning institutions in Kisumu.

Mrs Okwiri says to attain her success, a lot has to be put into taking care of the chicken.

“A lot has to be done like buying feeds and drugs and these must be obtained from accredited dealers to guarantee quality. In the five weeks of rearing, the broilers use around five bags of starter mash which goes at Sh2,250 a bag and 17 bags of finisher pellet, with a bag selling at Sh2,850,’’ she says.

“The layers also eat a lot of food.” She says the chicks also have to be vaccinated against New Castle disease and given multivitamins.

Buying of feeds and drugs is a challenge because the prices go up but you have to feed the chicks to weigh more in order to fetch better prices,” she says. To those planning to go into business, she says: ‘‘Start-ups don’t pick up as fast as one may want but patience pays.”

She encourages women and youth to learn to be self-dependent.

“They should not just sit by waiting for miracles to happen; I challenge them to take their destiny into their own hands. I have a very supportive husband but that does not mean that I should not work,” she says.

Please don’t let farm for 80,000 chickens spoil our childhood

LETTER: Grace and Maxim Plowright have sent to a letter to the local council objecting to plans for a chicken farm.DON’T build a chicken farm and spoil our rural play area is the message from two young campaigners who have joined the fight against the plans.

Grace and Maxim Plowman, both aged 10, have written to Wychavon District Council about their fears over a planned broiler rearing facility which would house 80,000 chickens.

The twins are from Naunton Beauchamp, one of the villages that would potentially be affected by the farm, proposed on a piece of land near Froghall bungalow in Naunton Road, Upton Snodsbury.

In the letter, Grace writes: “I love my home because it’s such a rural area. Which means no busy roads that keep me awake at night! But chickens going ‘cluck cluck cluck’ might keep me awake.

“I am also very happy to have a ford so close to me. I (and my friends) have a den there (by the side of piddle brook). If the chicken farm goes ahead the stinky chicken droppings will get stuck to cause a dam that will stop the fresh water flow which the animals drink.

“So please do the right thing and don’t spoil my childhood’.

Maxim adds: “The chicken farm will spoil the local environment, pollute the waters and damage natural areas of beauty.”

The twins’ parents Claire and Mike Plowman also have concerns. Mrs Plowman said: “Our main worries are the location. We sat the children down to talk to them about it.

There was no doubt they wanted to write the letters.”

Another worried resident, David Pollitt, of Cowsden, said the arrival of the farm would scupper an ambition to open his garden under the National Gardens Scheme.

The 74-year-old said: “If it does go ahead I don’t think I could speak to the NGS.”

Wychavon planning head Giorgio Framalicco said: “We’re considering the planning application and are very aware of public concern.”

Source: http://www.cotswoldjournal.co.uk/news/10481728.Please_don___t_let_farm_for_80_000_chickens_spoil_our_childhood/

BuyingPoultry.com – A Kickstarter Campaign

A free buying guide that takes the guesswork out of finding alternatives to factory farming.

CHOOSE BETTER.

Have you ever looked at a food label and thought, “Sounds good, but I have no idea what this means?” You’re not alone!

With so many food choices and claims out there, it’s hard to know where to get real information. What do Cage FreeFree RangeNatural, and Organic even mean? Is there a difference?

Our food choices have a huge impact on the world. People are purchasing food with increasing concern for ethical and social issues. Consumers are demanding more locally, humanely, and sustainably-produced animal products and plant-based alternatives.

That’s where BuyingPoultry.com comes in!

For the past four years, we’ve been working with high-welfare poultry farmers and animal welfare experts to create BuyingPoultry.com—a free buying guide that takes the guesswork out of choosing the most humane and sustainable poultry products and plant-based alternatives.

Buying Poultry will list every poultry producer and poultry certification in the United Sates and also tell you how they treat their animals, their employees, and the environment.

With BuyingPoultry.com, you’ll be able to see who’s best and who’s worst in the U.S. and in your local grocery store. We’ll list what each company can do better and make it easy for you to add your voice to the cause. We’ll also give you information about the best plant-based alternatives and where you can find them.

Best of all, it’ll be FREE and easy to access on your computer, smartphone, or tablet. 

Seems like a great idea, right? We think so too.

But creating a free tool that is comprehensive, authoritative, and functional isn’t as easy as it sounds. We have an amazing team of animal welfare experts and digital ninjas assembled to make Buying Poultry a reality.

Now all we need is your support!

China boils baby chickens alive as country is engulfed by panic over continuing outbreak of new strain of bird flu

  • Up to 30,000 chickens are being boiled alive every day at ONE FARM alone
  • Chinese authorities reveal four more people have died from the new strain
  • Total death toll from the H7N9 virus has now reached 31

 

Tens of thousands of baby chicks are being boiled alive in China as panic grips the country over the current outbreak of a mysterious new strain of bird flu.

Four more people have died from the new strain, bringing to the total number of deaths from the H7N9 virus to 31, Chinese health officials revealed yesterday.

Meanwhile, the number of infections has risen by two to 129, with health experts saying that the disease is probably being spread by poultry.

Quick and easy: A crate of newborn chicks is tipped into a pot of boiling water as the mass extermination of poultry continues in China triggered by the current outbreak of H7N9 bird flu in the countryQuick and easy: A crate of newborn chicks is tipped into a pot of boiling water as the mass extermination of poultry continues in China triggered by the current outbreak of H7N9 bird flu in the country

Desperate measures: Four more people have died from the new strain, bringing to the total number of deaths from the H7N9 virus to 31, Chinese health officials revealed yesterdayDesperate measures: Four more people have died from the new strain, bringing to the total number of deaths from the H7N9 virus to 31, Chinese health officials revealed yesterday

Boiled alive: The number of infections caused by the new virus has risen by two to 129, with health experts saying that the disease is probably being spread by poultryBoiled alive: The number of infections caused by the new virus has risen by two to 129, with health experts saying that the disease is probably being spread by poultry

Chicken farms facing official demands to dispose of as many birds as possible have now resorted to to killing off newborn chicks by plunging them in boiling water.

These photographs were taken at a poultry farm in Qingyuan city, in Guangdong province, south-east China, where as many as 30,000 new born chicks were dumped into boiling water to be killed every day.

Farm spokesman Fai T’ien said: ‘Before this virus outbreak we were hatching around 100,000 chicks a day. We have now cut that down to 50,000 and it is still too many and we are having to kill most of them.

‘We are putting a few aside to be vaccinated and sold onto the market but most are having to be killed by boiling them.’

Desperate to live: These photographs were taken at a poultry farm in Qingyuan city, in Guangdong province, south-east China, where as many as 30,000 new born chicks a day were dumped into boiling water to be killedDesperate to live: These photographs were taken at a poultry farm in Qingyuan city, in Guangdong province, south-east China, where as many as 30,000 new born chicks a day were dumped into boiling water to be killed

Grim work: A worker fishes dead birds from the bubbling pot, as thousands more packed in crates behind him wait to meet their fate. The Chinese government has ordered the mass extermination of birdsGrim work: A worker fishes dead birds from the bubbling pot, as thousands more packed in crates behind him wait to meet their fate. The Chinese government has ordered the mass extermination of birds

Not much better in store for this lot: Farm spokesman Fai T'ien said some of the newborn chickens were being put aside for vaccination and sale for slaughter, but most of their birds are having to be boiled aliveNot much better in store for this lot: Farm spokesman Fai T’ien said some of the newborn chickens were being put aside for vaccination and sale for slaughter, but most of their birds are having to be boiled alive

Farmers say that boiling is the easiest and quickest way to kill the chicks but there has been criticism by animal-rights activists who say that has to be a better way to deal with the problem.

The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) has said it has no evidence that the new strain of bird flu, which was first detected in patients in China in March, is easily transmissible between humans.

Chinese scientists have confirmed that the H7N9 strain has been transmitted to humans from chickens. But the WHO has said 40 per cent of people infected with H7N9 appear to have had no contact with poultry.

The Chinese government provided only scant details about the latest victims of H7N9.

Two occurred in the eastern province of Jiangsu; one was from eastern Zhejiang; while another was from central Anhui, based on a Reuters analysis of the data provided by Chinese health authorities on Monday.

The head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the current strain of bird flu cannot spark a pandemic in its current form.

He added, however, that there is no guarantee it will not mutate and become more dangerous.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2320731/China-boils-baby-chickens-alive-country-engulfed-panic-continuing-outbreak-new-strain-bird-flu.html#ixzz2ScCW4Yx4

The Chicken of Tomorrow

I love this documentary.  It’s a real eye opener into the progression of chicken farming in the 1940’s.

The Chicken of Tomorrow deals with poultry farming and egg farming in the mid-1940s in the USA. It was filmed to educate the public about how poultry and eggs are farmed, it also deals with how advances in genetic engineering and technology produces a larger chicken. Eggs are farmed and kept in industrial incubators, and an equal number of chickens are used for meat and other products. Altogether, this produces more food for less money, and allows people to support local poultry farms without breaking the bank. This is relatively similar to today’s poultry farming despite there now being technological differences.

3 Dirty Chicken Facts Exposed

PHOTO: Many chickens sold in supermarkets are fed a steady diet of human drugs.Many chickens sold in supermarkets are fed a steady diet of human drugs.

Think the pink slime scandal is gross? There’s even more unappetizing news, this time from the poultry department. By testing feathers, researchers from Johns Hopkins University found that “healthy chicken” sold in your supermarket could have very well been raised on a steady diet of prescription, over-the-counter, and even banned drugs.

The full implication of people eating chicken containing these drugs isn’t even known, although previous studies have shown carcinogenic arsenic fed to chickens—something approved for use in nonorganic chicken farming—does wind up in the meat.

In the study, researchers tested feather meal, a by-product of chicken farming often used as fertilizer, because feathers accumulate important clues as to which drugs and chemicals chickens are exposed to during their short—usually about eight-week—lives.

The contaminated chicken report is the latest in a string of findings suggesting the industrial food system that supplies most supermarkets routinely engages in practices that could put consumers at risk.

And this, the study’s coauthor says, is just the tip of the iceberg.

“There are a wide spectrum of public health, social justice, and environmental concerns that stem from the way we raise animals for food,” explains researcher Keeve Nachman, PhD, assistant scientist and director of the Farming for the Future program at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, part of the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health. “These concerns range from the generation and transport of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics that are critical to human medicine, to the disproportionate concentration of animal-production sites and their associated air and water pollution in low-income communities of color, to the overwhelming energy and water inputs required to grow and transport feed for food animals.”

Dirty Chicken Facts Exposed

News of these dangers is going mainstream, too. In a recent New York Times column, Nicholas Kristof outlined the dangers of the industrial poultry system, saying, “I used to be skeptical of organic, but the more reporting I do on our food supply, the more I want my own family eating organic—just to be safe.”

Here’s what industry is feeding your chickens, according to feather testing:

Antidepressants, Painkillers, Allergy Meds

Sure, the conditions in factory farms are depressing. But researchers were surprised to find active ingredients of human antidepressant drugs like Prozac in the chicken feather product tested. The mood-stabilizing drug was detected in U.S.-sold chicken imported from China, and is apparently used to reduce anxiety in chickens, since stress can slow growth and lead to tougher meat, according to Kristof’s report.

Caffeine

Nachman’s team also detected caffeine in about half of the chicken feather samples. Caffeine is used to keep the chickens awake so they eat more and grow faster.

Banned Antibiotics

Surprise! Feather tests suggest large-scale poultry producers are using banned antibiotics in poultry production. “We were especially surprised to find residues of a number of over-the-counter drugs, including the active ingredients of Tylenol, Benadryl, and Prozac, but what was even more disturbing was finding residues of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, since these drugs have been banned from poultry production since 2005,” Nachman says.

This class of antibiotics includes Cipro, a high-powered drug often used in humans when other antibiotics don’t work. It was banned in the poultry industry about seven years ago because researchers were detecting that its use in farming was leading to antibiotic-resistant superbug strains that could potentially kill humans. To date, superbugs kill about 17,000 people in the U.S. a year.

Despite all this, the FDA has made it clear that it plans to not formally ban antibiotic use in food animal products, but rather ask farmers to voluntarily limit use.

“Our research suggests that drugs that are illegal in poultry production may still be in use,” Nachman says. “Given this, I have little confidence that a voluntary approach will have any impact on the food animal industry’s abuse of antibiotics.”

Seek Out Undrugged Meat

To find more humanely and naturally raised chicken, look for local grass-fed poultry farmers who don’t use routine antibiotics or arsenic in feed. (LocalHarvest.org is a good resource.) If you’re shopping in the supermarket, opt for organic—standards for organic include bans on the use of antibiotics, arsenic, and many other unappetizing chicken-farming practices.

Source: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/dirty-chicken-facts-exposed/story?id=16724335&page=2#.UW_1D34tDS0